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Rapid City Journal — March 18, 2012

In general, I'd say the Journal's sports fronts aim for hierarchy, cleanliness and simplicity above all other aspects of design. We really play our high school sports big in this paper. It doesn't get much bigger than three of the state's most dominant boys basketball programs all winning championships on the same night.

The overarching headline was the most important part of the package, and then getting out of the way of the photos and letting the stories do their work was the other tactic in my approach.

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Rapid City Journal — April 22, 2012

Again, the treatment of high school sports — and an immediate local focus, at that — is of high importance for this paper. The current policy in South Dakota allows for a rather surprising amount of flexibility for athletes who want to change schools in order to attend what are perceived as more prestigious programs in certain activities. A contingent of schools is trying to get that policy altered.

The reverse-type photo illustration approach is one we rarely use, but it's an attention-getter when the topic merits the play.

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Rapid City Journal — Feb. 9, 2012

The Journal's style is much in favor of anchoring the centerpiece element on the left-hand side of the front page. This ideal is consistent both on the A section front and the sports front. Features fronts reverse this dynamic.

There's no real great way to make a story about radio availability a centerpiece with traditional art conventions. I think the radio itself clearly states the subject of the story, and the white background helps create the "silence" aspect of the story. The antenna serves as a good anchor for all the floating white space, and there's plenty of space to put a simple, modular text presentation.

I was the author of this story, so it's also easier as a designer to create the desired effect when you already know the tone of the article.

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Rapid City Journal — March 31, 2011

Baseball has a unique dynamic in the Black Hills. There's an American Legion program with a national winning tradition lasting more than six decades. Little League squads have reached the World Series twice in the past five years. But the nearest professional team is six hours away in Colorado.

Before the Rockies came around in the mid-1990s, the Minnesota Twins were the region's only MLB option. We needed to pit these two fan bases, the old and the new, together and with equal placement. The teams' circular logos helped balance the page. I wrote the main article for this presentation.

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Columbia Missourian — Sept. 25, 2008

This sports front features a football story about a reserve linebacker for the Missouri football team. This player has earned the admiration of all his teammates for work on and off the football field after serving a tour of duty during the Iraq War.

If I had another chance to design the page, I'd have eliminated the introductory text above the photos, because it ended up getting lost in the design. But the photos and headline largely get out of the way of the story, and I was able to work directly with the reporter, now ESPN.com's David Ubben, to set the right tone.

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Columbia Missourian — Oct. 23, 2008

What's worth pointing out here is my control over the entire page. I wrote all the headlines for the presentation and independently came up with all the infobox material to bolster the intent of the centerpiece story. This page helps display my mindset for reporting, designing and editing all rolled into one.

Click the image to view and download a .pdf.